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Willkommen bei Fledermaus Station Österreich!

Fledermäuse in guten Händen

Fledermaus in Not gefunden – was tun?

Notfallnummer: 
+43 670/6028666

Schau nicht weg – RUF AN!

Vielen Dank an Raphael Friedlmayer für das Video!

Erste Hilfe

  • A year of bat care
    The number of bats needing care fluctuates greatly. In the winter months, injured adult animals stay with us and are given the opportunity to be overwintered, during which they are regularly checked on. Improper tree pruning is also still being carried out during this cold period, which not only forces entire bat colonies into homelessness, but in most cases also leads to large-scale, sometimes fatal, injuries. This can result in a sudden increase of 100-150 animals that require immediate medical care. In the summer months, animals that are disturbed in their roosts can usually find alternative accommodation more easily than in the winter, but juvenile animals often miss out. The loss of their parents also represents an immediately life-threatening situation for them. Young animals, even in smaller numbers, lead to increased care requirements due to the high demands of proper housing and frequent feedings.
  • Bat care

    Keeping and caring for insectivorous bats is extremely labor- and time- intensive. Without comprehensive care from caregivers, the death rate is very high. Thanks to our trained team of animal keepers, biologists and veterinarians, the bats are in good hands around the clock.
  • Legal basis
    The basis of our animal shelter and the work with bats itself is based on the EU's FFH (Fauna-Flora-Habitat) Directive from 1992. This directive must be implemented in national law, which is done by  the individual federal states via their nature conservation laws. The FFH Directive contains various appendices and priorities, of which Appendices II and IV are relevant for bats. The aim of the directive is "[...] to contribute to securing biodiversity through the conservation of natural habitats and wild animals and plants in the European territory of the Member States." Species in Annex II.: Protected areas must be created; appropriate monitoring is required. Appendix IV species: Strict protection (all bat species). In Vienna, this is regulated in Section 10 Paragraph 3 of the Vienna Nature Conservation Act and in the Vienna Nature Conservation Ordinance. According to this, all bats in Vienna are strictly protected, which means they are not allowed to be caught, their roosts are not allowed to be destroyed and they are not allowed to be killed. Our bat station makes a vital contribution to achieving the goals set out in the directive. In addition, close cooperation with the KFFÖ (Coordination Center for Bat Protection and Research Austria) and MA 22 (Municipal Dept. for Environmental Protection) is of great importance for many reasons: · passing on data sets (monthly records) · discovery of roosts and nurseries through the rescue of individuals (important for further conservation measures) · if immediate intervention is required, e.g. during construction work on buildings or tree cutting - a joint rescue operation can be launched. Further measures to prevent repeated emergency situations in already known locations can be taken over by MA 22. · Public education We all have a common goal. Through close cooperation with the KFFÖ and MA 22, we can make a valuable contribution to species protection
  • Endangered bat species in Austria
    Of the approximately 1,400 species worldwide, at least 30 bat species are currently recorded in Austria. Vienna alone is currently home to 23 species. Many bat species are listed as “vulnerable” or even “threatened with extinction” in the IUCN (“International Union for Conservation of Nature”) red list of endangered mammal species in Austria. As similar as these various species may seem to some, their behavior and needs are very different. There are not only interspecies differences, but within a species too - from individual to individual. This represents an additional factor that makes bat care so challenging. Sure, conserving a species is important…but why save individuals? “You only protect what you love, you only love what you know.” (Konrad Lorenz) Individuals can have an impact on an entire population, e.g. rescued females can give birth to the next generation, hand-reared bats can become healthy adults Through public involvement and engagement, awareness can be spread and meaningful changes can be made regarding things such as construction, tree-pruning practices, or creating closed enclosures for outdoor cats. Mother-offspring interactions, composition of colostrum, stress hormones and much more can be researched using rescued individuals.
  • Bats and us
    In Vienna, as well as in all other urban centers in Austria, bats feel right at home just as they do in the countryside. Sadly, they are often harmed by construction work, tree pruning, poor building design, loss of roost or even demolitions. These animals are in particular need of our help. Unfortunately, due to numerous rumors and myths that persist among us (such as the idea that all bats will suck your blood) many people are afraid to help the animals and bring them to a bat station. It’s easier to recognize distress in more traditionally “harmless” animals, and therefore people have a greater willingness to actually bring the animal to safety. Emergency number if a bat is found (+43 670/6028666)
  • Proper securing
    Do not handle bats or other wild animals without gloves or a cloth. Prepare a container with a lid (a shoe box or something similar works best) with small air holes (no bigger than the tines of a fork). Line with paper towel and place a piece of slightly moistened and crumpled up paper towel in a corner (this is so the bat may quench its thirst if needed). Using a tea towel or wearing gloves, gently but quickly pick up the bat and put it in the container. Close the container well, bats are escape artists (use multiple rubber bands or tape). If there are several animals in need, please make sure that there is enough space and that the animals are not lying on top of each other.
  • When does a bat need help?
    If the bat... is on the ground (healthy bats can take flight from the ground). is/was trapped (e.g. in an apartment or in a stairwell). is hanging exposed on a wall during the day,. has had contact with a pet or contact cannot be ruled out, especially contact with a cat. has to be fished out of water. is seen in winter (normally, bats overwinter in a sheltered location). is seen falling out of hollow trunks or branches while one is trimming/felling trees – watch out, there may be several animals! is a motherless young animal, during the baby season (June until August). Please call us immediately and do not attempt to feed the pup. +43 670 6028666
  • Bat found in distress - what now?
    Please call us immediately on our emergency number 0670/6028666. We're happy to help and will direct you to the nearest bat care center. Photos and a clear description of the situation help us to provide optimal advice.
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Werde Teil von Fledermaus Station Österreich!

Um den Mitgliedschaftsantrag (nur 18 € pro Jahr) zu erhalten, klicken Sie bitte auf den Button und senden Sie uns das ausgefüllte PDF per E-Mail zu.

Unsere Arbeit

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Tierheim

„Fledermaus Station Österreich“ ist ein gemeinnütziger Verein. Wir sind ein Team aus ehrenamtlichen TierpflegerInnen, TierärztInnen, BiologInnen und vielen weiteren freiwilligen MitarbeiterInnen.

Wir stellen eine adäquate Anlaufstelle für alle FinderInnen verletzter oder verwaister Fledermäuse dar. Mit unserem gesammelten Wissen und unserer Erfahrung, die wir über die lange Zusammenarbeit mit der ehemaligen Station an der Veterinärmedizinischen Universität Wien erworben haben, möchten wir die bestmögliche Versorgung dieser speziellen Tiere garantieren. Die Fledermausstation der Veterinärmedizinischen Universität war von 2005 bis 2021 für die Versorgung der Fledermäuse zuständig. In den Räumlichkeiten, die uns der Verein „Blauer Kreis“ (Zoologische Gesellschaft Österreich für Tier- und Artenschutz) dankenswerterweise zur Verfügung gestellt hat, ist nun wieder ein Tierheim nur für Fledermäuse entstanden.

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Pflege

Unsere Arbeit erstreckt sich von der telefonischen Beratung zu Fledermaus-Fragen über die Sicherung der verletzten Tiere, Pflege und Auswilderung am

Fundort, bis hin zu vielen schlaflosen Nächten in der Jungtierzeit (Fledermäuse sind ja bekanntlich Säugetiere und ihre Babys brauchen alle 2 Stunden spezielle Aufzuchtsmilch – auch in der Nacht). Das Ziel unserer Pflegetätigkeit ist die schnellstmögliche Rehabilitation der PatientInnen, damit sie ganz ihrem natürlichen Verhalten entsprechend die Nächte wieder draußen jagen können. Es gibt jedoch auch immer wieder Fälle, in denen ein längerer stationärer Aufenthalt notwendig ist, wie bei großen Schäden an den Flughäuten. In vereinzelten Fällen zeigt sich nach längerer Pflege, dass ein Tier aufgrund seiner Invalidität nicht mehr eigenständig in der freien Natur überleben kann. Wir betreuen auch vereinzelt Tiere, die in der Langzeitpflege unter engmaschiger tierärztlicher Kontrolle, ihrer Grunderkrankung entsprechend in guter Lebensqualität mit Artgenossenen in Dauerpflege leben. Foto Jungtier: Fledermäuse bitte immer mit Handschuhen angreifen, unsere PflegerInnen sind Tollwut geimpft und unsere Jungtiere kennen uns gut:)

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Vision

Unsere Vision ist es, das Image der Fledermäuse wieder in das richtige Licht zu rücken, um endlich mit hartnäckigen Gerüchten und Vorurteilen aufzuräumen. 

Durch unsere Aufklärungsarbeit bei Vorträgen, Veranstaltungen und Schulführungen wollen wir über unsere ehrenamtliche Arbeit und über unsere unglaublichen Pfleglinge berichten und wie unglaublich spannend und nützlich sie zudem für uns Menschen sind.

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Fledermaus Station Kontakt

Notfallnummer +43 670/6028666

Wir bemühen uns rund um die Uhr für Sie erreichbar zu sein!

weitere Kontakte

Wien:

Christoph Käs

+43 676 3700809

Oberösterreich:

Dr. Sara Eper

+43 660 6306673

Salzburg:

Zoo Salzburg

+43 662 820176

Niederösterreich:

St. Pölten + Umgebung

Regina Döllinger

+43 660 1355949

Niederösterreich:

Hollabrunn + Umgebung

Wilhelm Müllebner 

+43 664 3551845

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Jetzt Helfen!

Sie wollen helfen? 

Jährlich betreuen wir rund 400 Fledermauspfleglinge in ganz Österreich, die geschwächt und/oder verletzt zu uns kommen. Ziel unserer Pflege ist es, die PatientInnen so schnell wie möglich zu rehabilitieren, damit sie wieder ihrem natürlichen Verhalten entsprechend nachts im Freien jagen können.

 

Es gibt aber auch immer wieder Fälle, in denen ein längerer stationärer Aufenthalt notwendig ist, wie z.B. bei großen Schäden an den Flughäuten. Für den Unterhalt unseres ehrenamtlich geführten Fledermaus Tierheimes sind wir auf Spenden angewiesen.

Helfen Sie uns jetzt mit einer PayPal-Spende

Fledermaus Station Österreich
Betreff: Spende
AT54 2011 1850 4129 2500 | BIC GIBAATWWXXX

oder QR-Code im Bank-App einscannen!

 

 

 

 


 

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  • A year of bat care
    The number of bats needing care fluctuates greatly. In the winter months, injured adult animals stay with us and are given the opportunity to be overwintered, during which they are regularly checked on. Improper tree pruning is also still being carried out during this cold period, which not only forces entire bat colonies into homelessness, but in most cases also leads to large-scale, sometimes fatal, injuries. This can result in a sudden increase of 100-150 animals that require immediate medical care. In the summer months, animals that are disturbed in their roosts can usually find alternative accommodation more easily than in the winter, but juvenile animals often miss out. The loss of their parents also represents an immediately life-threatening situation for them. Young animals, even in smaller numbers, lead to increased care requirements due to the high demands of proper housing and frequent feedings.
  • Bat care

    Keeping and caring for insectivorous bats is extremely labor- and time- intensive. Without comprehensive care from caregivers, the death rate is very high. Thanks to our trained team of animal keepers, biologists and veterinarians, the bats are in good hands around the clock.
  • Legal basis
    The basis of our animal shelter and the work with bats itself is based on the EU's FFH (Fauna-Flora-Habitat) Directive from 1992. This directive must be implemented in national law, which is done by  the individual federal states via their nature conservation laws. The FFH Directive contains various appendices and priorities, of which Appendices II and IV are relevant for bats. The aim of the directive is "[...] to contribute to securing biodiversity through the conservation of natural habitats and wild animals and plants in the European territory of the Member States." Species in Annex II.: Protected areas must be created; appropriate monitoring is required. Appendix IV species: Strict protection (all bat species). In Vienna, this is regulated in Section 10 Paragraph 3 of the Vienna Nature Conservation Act and in the Vienna Nature Conservation Ordinance. According to this, all bats in Vienna are strictly protected, which means they are not allowed to be caught, their roosts are not allowed to be destroyed and they are not allowed to be killed. Our bat station makes a vital contribution to achieving the goals set out in the directive. In addition, close cooperation with the KFFÖ (Coordination Center for Bat Protection and Research Austria) and MA 22 (Municipal Dept. for Environmental Protection) is of great importance for many reasons: · passing on data sets (monthly records) · discovery of roosts and nurseries through the rescue of individuals (important for further conservation measures) · if immediate intervention is required, e.g. during construction work on buildings or tree cutting - a joint rescue operation can be launched. Further measures to prevent repeated emergency situations in already known locations can be taken over by MA 22. · Public education We all have a common goal. Through close cooperation with the KFFÖ and MA 22, we can make a valuable contribution to species protection
  • Endangered bat species in Austria
    Of the approximately 1,400 species worldwide, at least 30 bat species are currently recorded in Austria. Vienna alone is currently home to 23 species. Many bat species are listed as “vulnerable” or even “threatened with extinction” in the IUCN (“International Union for Conservation of Nature”) red list of endangered mammal species in Austria. As similar as these various species may seem to some, their behavior and needs are very different. There are not only interspecies differences, but within a species too - from individual to individual. This represents an additional factor that makes bat care so challenging. Sure, conserving a species is important…but why save individuals? “You only protect what you love, you only love what you know.” (Konrad Lorenz) Individuals can have an impact on an entire population, e.g. rescued females can give birth to the next generation, hand-reared bats can become healthy adults Through public involvement and engagement, awareness can be spread and meaningful changes can be made regarding things such as construction, tree-pruning practices, or creating closed enclosures for outdoor cats. Mother-offspring interactions, composition of colostrum, stress hormones and much more can be researched using rescued individuals.
  • Bats and us
    In Vienna, as well as in all other urban centers in Austria, bats feel right at home just as they do in the countryside. Sadly, they are often harmed by construction work, tree pruning, poor building design, loss of roost or even demolitions. These animals are in particular need of our help. Unfortunately, due to numerous rumors and myths that persist among us (such as the idea that all bats will suck your blood) many people are afraid to help the animals and bring them to a bat station. It’s easier to recognize distress in more traditionally “harmless” animals, and therefore people have a greater willingness to actually bring the animal to safety. Emergency number if a bat is found (+43 670/6028666)
  • Proper securing
    Do not handle bats or other wild animals without gloves or a cloth. Prepare a container with a lid (a shoe box or something similar works best) with small air holes (no bigger than the tines of a fork). Line with paper towel and place a piece of slightly moistened and crumpled up paper towel in a corner (this is so the bat may quench its thirst if needed). Using a tea towel or wearing gloves, gently but quickly pick up the bat and put it in the container. Close the container well, bats are escape artists (use multiple rubber bands or tape). If there are several animals in need, please make sure that there is enough space and that the animals are not lying on top of each other.
  • When does a bat need help?
    If the bat... is on the ground (healthy bats can take flight from the ground). is/was trapped (e.g. in an apartment or in a stairwell). is hanging exposed on a wall during the day,. has had contact with a pet or contact cannot be ruled out, especially contact with a cat. has to be fished out of water. is seen in winter (normally, bats overwinter in a sheltered location). is seen falling out of hollow trunks or branches while one is trimming/felling trees – watch out, there may be several animals! is a motherless young animal, during the baby season (June until August). Please call us immediately and do not attempt to feed the pup. +43 670 6028666
  • Bat found in distress - what now?
    Please call us immediately on our emergency number 0670/6028666. We're happy to help and will direct you to the nearest bat care center. Photos and a clear description of the situation help us to provide optimal advice.

Team Fledermaus

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In coordination with
Bat World Sanctuary

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Wissenswertes

Einblicke in die Welt der Fledermäuse

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